Princeton NJ Residential Real Estate Properties

Single Family Homes, Townhomes and Condos in Princeton New Jersey in Mercer County which is located in Central Southern New Jersey 

Princeton is a municipality with a borough form of government in Mercer County, New Jersey, that was established on January 1, 2013, through the consolidation of the Borough of Princeton and Princeton Township. Lenni Lenape Indians were the earliest identifiable inhabitants of the Princeton area. Europeans founded their settlement in the latter part of the 17th century. The first European to find his home in the boundaries of the future town was Henry Greenland. He built his house in 1683 along with a tavern. In this drinking hole representatives of West and East Jersey met to set boundaries for the location of the township,  Originally, Princeton was known only as part of nearby Stony Brook. Mr. James Leonard first referred to the town as Prince-town,[when?] when describing the location of his large estate in his diary. The town bore a variety of names subsequently, including: Princetown, Prince's Town and finally Princeton.[18] Although there is no official documentary backing, the town is considered to be named after King William III, Prince William of Orange of the House of Nassau. Another theory suggests that the name came from a large land-owner named Henry Prince, but there is no evidence that this was the case.[18] It is more likely for the settlement to be named after a prince, as three nearby towns had similar names: Kingston, Queenstown (later named Pennington) and Princessville.  Aside from housing the University of the same name, the settlement suffered the revolutionary Battle of Princeton on its soil. After the victory in 1777, the town hosted the first Legislature under the State Constitution of New Jersey to decide the State’s seal, Governor and organization of its government. In addition, two of the original signers of the Declaration of Independence—Richard Stockton and John Witherspoon lived in Princeton.[17] Princetonians honored their citizen’s legacy by naming two streets in the downtown area after them. On January 10, 1938 Henry Ewing Hale called for a group of citizens to discuss opening a “Historical Society of Princeton.” Later the Bainbridge House would be dedicated for this purpose. Previously the house was used once for a meeting of Continental Congress in 1783, a general office and as the Princeton Public Library. The House is actually property of Princeton University and is leased to the Princeton Historical Society for one dollar per year.[21] The house has kept its original staircase, flooring and paneled walls. All together, 70% of the house has been unaltered. Aside from safety features like wheelchair access and electrical work, the house was merely restored to its original look.
Princeton is best known as the location of Princeton University, which has been sited in the community since 1756. Although Princeton is a "college town", there are other important institutions in the area, including the Institute for Advanced Study, Westminster Choir College, Princeton Theological Seminary, Educational Testing Service (ETS), Opinion Research Corporation, Siemens Corporate Research, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Sarnoff Corporation, FMC Corporation, The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Amrep, Church and Dwight, Berlitz International, and Dow Jones & Company.-- New Jersey's capital is the city of Trenton, but the governor's official residence has been in Princeton since 1945, when Morven in the borough became the first Governor's mansion. It was later replaced by the larger Drumthwacket, a colonial mansion located in the township. Morven became a museum property of the New Jersey Historical Society. Princeton was named No. 15 of the top 100 towns in the United States to Live and Work In by Money Magazine in 200.  Although residents of Princeton (Princetonians) traditionally have a strong community-wide identity, the community had been composed of two separate municipalities: a township and a borough. The central borough was completely surrounded by the township. The Borough seceded from the Township in 1894 in a dispute over school taxes; the two municipalities later formed the Princeton Public Schools, and some other public services were conducted together before they were reunited into a single Princeton in January 2013. The Borough contained Nassau Street, the main commercial street, most of the University campus, and incorporated most of the urban area until the postwar suburbanization. Borough and Township had roughly equal populations.  During the most stirring events in its history, Princeton was a wide spot in the road; the boundary between Somerset County and Middlesex County ran right through Princeton, along the high road between New York and Philadelphia, now Nassau Street. When Mercer County was formed in 1838, part of West Windsor Township was added to the portion of Montgomery Township which was included in the new county, and made into Princeton Township; the area between the present borough line and the Delaware and Raritan Canal was added to Princeton Township in 1853. Princeton Borough became a separate municipality in 1894.
In the early nineteenth century, New Jersey boroughs had been parish bodies, chartered within existing townships. Princeton Borough received such a charter in 1813, as part of Montgomery and West Windsor Townships; it continued to be part of Princeton Township until the Act of 1894, which required that each township form a single school district; rather than do so, Princeton Borough petitioned to be separated. (The two Princetons now form the Princeton Regional School district.) Two minor boundary changes united the then site of the Princeton Hospital and of the Princeton Regional High School inside the Borough, in 1928 and 1951 respectively.
Princeton University is a dominant feature of the community. Its main campus has its historic center on Nassau Street in the borough and stretches south into the township. Its James Forrestal satellite campus is located in Plainsboro Township, and some playing fields (and half of the University's Lake Carnegie) lie within adjacent West Windsor Township, New Jersey|West Windsor Township.
Westminster Choir College, a four-year residential college of music and division of Rider University, splits its campus between Princeton Township and Princeton Borough.
Princeton Theological Seminary's academic campus is located in the Borough, and residential housing is located just outside the Township in West Windsor Township.
The Institute for Advanced Study is in the Township and maintains extensive land holdings (the "Institute Woods") there.

ATTRACTIONS:

*  Princeton Airport

*  Delaware Raritan Canal State Park, New Jersey
The canal is accessible from many points along its route, with small parking areas providing access at most road crossings. One of the most scenic and popular sections of the D&R Canal state park is the segment along Lake Carnegie in Princeton, New Jersey, which features the canal on one side of the path and the lake on the other side. Another attractive section borders the Colonial Park Arboretum and Gardens in East Millstone.

*  Bunker Hill Golf Courses (Distinct Golf)
*  Springdale Golf Club
*  Princeton Country Club, West Windsor Township

162 Filters
  • City / Town
  • PrincetonCity
  • County
  • MercerCounty
  • Zip
  • Radius
  • Shape
  • MLS #
Additional Search Options
  • + Days On Website
  • + Street Address
  • + Style
  • + Waterfront
  • + Fireplace
  • + Garage
  • + Basement
  • + 55+ Community
  • + School District
  • + Foreclosure / Short Sale

Properties in Greater Delaware Valley matching States: NJ, Counties: Mercer, Towns: Princeton, Property Types: Detached, Semi-Detached, Row/Townhous, Listing Types: resale

Refine Search
162
Sort
  • Map
  • List
  • Grid
Draw: Cancel
Real Estate Search Tools are powered by Onjax Premium IDX, part of the Onjax Real Estate Platform
© 2017 Onjax, LLC. All Rights Reserved.
Please Note: All information provided is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed and should be independently verified. The property information provided on EXIT Realty JP Rothermel's websites is for personal, non-commercial use only and may not be used for any purpose other than to identify prospective properties consumers may be interested in purchasing. Property information is gathered from third-party resources including the seller and public records. EXIT Realty JP Rothermel, Onjax, LLC, its affiliates, owners, subsidiaries and subscribers disclaim any and all representations or warranties as to the accuracy or reliability of the information provided. You should verify all claims through personal inspection and/or contact with the appropriate real estate professionals.
© 2017 TReND, All Rights Reserved.
The data relating to real estate for sale on this website appears in part through the TReND Broker ReciprocitySM program, a voluntary cooperative exchange of property listing data between licensed real estate brokerage firms in which participates, and is provided by TReND through a licensing agreement. Some properties listed with participating firms do not appear on this website at the request of the seller. Some properties which appear for sale on this website may no longer be available because they are under contract, have sold or are no longer being offered for sale. Some real estate firms do not participate in Broker ReciprocitySM and their listings do not appear on this website.
Last Updated 08/20/2017 at 9:08am - Some properties which appear for sale on this web site may subsequently have sold or may no longer be available.
Agent Login    |    Powered by Onjax
Create Free Account or
Choose Your Agent (optional)
I agree to the Terms of Use
Keep me updated about interest rates and market information by our trusted local lending partner.
Equal Housing Opportunity Realtor MLS
Sign-In or